The importance of Females’ Education

This is the story of a village somewhere in the far northwest side of the Federally tribal areas of Pakistan. The village is a valley, surrounded by green blushing mountains, houses made of stones and mud and people living their lives in a joint family system for generations. Usually, during the night, all the men get together in a hujra (a kind of guest house and place of social interaction), while the girls get together in a house to play games and discuss different matters. Along, living a happy life during the early 1990s, there was no concept of girls’ education in this village.

There was a schoolteacher named “Mr. Khan”, who was also living his life and at the time he had a five-year-old daughter named “Pari”, which means “Angel”. Pari was a white girl with yellowish-brown long hair and big black eyes. In her early age she was a bit different than the other kids, as she used to play with books and pens. At that time, Mr. Khan saw her affection and devotion for education and he decided to send her to the school to be a well-educated person and serve the community.

Back then, there was no girls school in this village because the girls’ education was considered against the rules and norms of the culture and society, so he had no choice but to take his daughter to the school where he used to teach to boys. Everything was going well until Pari reached her fifth grade because her father was teaching the boys until their fifth grade. That’s why she had to go to another town nearby for more education. Her father decided to admit her in a school which was about 30 km away from her home.

When the people of the village saw that Mr. Khan is sending his daughter to another town for her education, they were so angry at him and everyone was gossiping about him and his daughter. They kept saying that there’s no need for girls to be educated.

One day her uncles, along with other elders of the village, came to her house and said to Mr. Khan, that “From now onwards you will not send your daughter to the school as it is against the rules and norms of our culture and honor, or otherwise you will not be a part of our community anymore”.

Mr. Khan tried to explain to them that one day she’ll become a doctor and she’ll serve this community, but they made fun of him and everyone in the town denied to talk to him or make any relation. But even then, Mr. Khan and his wife didn’t lose hope and continued sending Pari to the school.

The importance of Females’ Education

This is the story of a village somewhere in the far northwest side of the Federally tribal areas of Pakistan. The village is a valley, surrounded by green blushing mountains, houses made of stones and mud and people living their lives in a joint family system for generations. Usually, during the night, all the men get together in a hujra (a kind of guest house and place of social interaction), while the girls get together in a house to play games and discuss different matters. Along, living a happy life during the early 1990s, there was no concept of girls’ education in this village.

There was a schoolteacher named “Mr. Khan”, who was also living his life and at the time he had a five-year-old daughter named “Pari”, which means “Angel”. Pari was a white girl with yellowish-brown long hair and big black eyes. In her early age she was a bit different than the other kids, as she used to play with books and pens. At that time, Mr. Khan saw her affection and devotion for education and he decided to send her to the school to be a well-educated person and serve the community.

Back then, there was no girls school in this village because the girls’ education was considered against the rules and norms of the culture and society, so he had no choice but to take his daughter to the school where he used to teach to boys. Everything was going well until Pari reached her fifth grade because her father was teaching the boys until their fifth grade. That’s why she had to go to another town nearby for more education. Her father decided to admit her in a school which was about 30 km away from her home.

When the people of the village saw that Mr. Khan is sending his daughter to another town for her education, they were so angry at him and everyone was gossiping about him and his daughter. They kept saying that there’s no need for girls to be educated.

One day her uncles, along with other elders of the village, came to her house and said to Mr. Khan, that “From now onwards you will not send your daughter to the school as it is against the rules and norms of our culture and honor, or otherwise you will not be a part of our community anymore”.

Mr. Khan tried to explain to them that one day she’ll become a doctor and she’ll serve this community, but they made fun of him and everyone in the town denied to talk to him or make any relation. But even then, Mr. Khan and his wife didn’t lose hope and continued sending Pari to the school.

After a decade Pari changed to Dr. Pari. Yes, she became a medical doctor. She emerged as a great doctor – everyone started to know her, and now whenever there is a patient, who belongs to her district, they are calling Mr. Khan to tell Pari to help their patient in the hospital and she is serving them, no matter who the patient is to her.

Seeing her and her other successful sisters, the people of the village felt the importance of education and now everyone in the village is sending their sisters and daughters to school to get well educated and become good human beings.

Izas Ali

After a decade Pari changed to Dr. Pari. Yes, she became a medical doctor. She emerged as a great doctor – everyone started to know her, and now whenever there is a patient, who belongs to her district, they are calling Mr. Khan to tell Pari to help their patient in the hospital and she is serving them, no matter who the patient is to her.

Seeing her and her other successful sisters, the people of the village felt the importance of education and now everyone in the village is sending their sisters and daughters to school to get well educated and become good human beings.

Izas Ali

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